Genealogy

If you are serious about genealogy, you will inevitable find a census record that is almost illegible. I have squinted at many of them. So, when I found this little poem I thought, “So true.”

Ocupsyshun – sencus taker

“I am a cencus takers for the city of Bufflow. Our City has groan very fast in resent years and now in 1865, it has become a hart and time consuming job to count all the peephill. There are not many that can do this werk, as it is nesessarie to have an ejucashun, wich a lot of pursons still do not have. Anuther atribeart needed for this job is good speling, for many of the pepill to be counted can hardle speek inglish, let alon spel there names!”

Genealogists

We are people to whom the past is forever speaking. We listen to it because we cannot help ourselves, for the past speaks to us with many voices.

Far out of that dark nowhere which is the time before we were born, men and women who were flesh of our flesh and bone of our bone went through fire and storm to break a path to the future.

We are part of the future they died for; they are part of the past that brought the future. What they did – the lives they lived, the sacrifices they made, the stories they told, the songs they sang, and, finally, the deaths they died – make up a part of our own experience.

We cannot cut ourselves off from it. It is as real to us as something that happened last week. It is a basic part of our heritage as human beings.

YOU
2 parents
4 grandparents
8 gr grandparents
16 gg grandparents
32 ggg grandparents
64 gggg grandparents
128 ggggg grandparents
256 gggggg grandparents
512 ggggggg grandparents
1,024 gggggggg grandparents
2,048 ggggggggg grandparents
4,096 gggggggggg grandparents
8,192 ggggggggggg grandparents
16,384 ggggggggggg grandparents
32,768 ggggggggggggg grandparents
65,536 gggggggggggggg grandparents
131,072 ggggggggggggggg grandparents
262,144 gggggggggggggggg grandparents
524,288 ggggggggggggggggg grandparents
1,048,576 gggggggggggggggggg grandparents
2,097,152 ggggggggggggggggggg grandparents
4,194,304 gggggggggggggggggggg grandparents
You have a lot of work to do.
* The genealogist, not wanting to lie about his ancestor but not wanting anyone to know the person was hanged, wrote, “Grandfather died during a public ceremony when the platform on which he was standing collapsed beneath him”.
* “In our family,” the little girl told her teacher, “everybody married relatives. My father married my mother, my uncle married my aunt, and just the other day I found out that my grandfather married my grandmother.”
* A modern mother is explaining to her little girl about pictures in the family photo album. “This is the geneticist with your surrogate mother and here’s your sperm donor and your father’s clone. This is me holding you when you were just a frozen embryo. The lady with the very troubled look on her face is your aunt, a genealogist.”
* Some men’s names appear in the paper only 3 times:
The first time they’re too young to read it,
The second time they’re too dazed to read it,
The last time they’re too dead to read it.

Tell your children of it, and let your children tell their children, and their children another generation. (Joel 1:3)

They say you should give a child roots and wings. Here are your roots. Be proud that a tiny bit of each of these people has gone into making you the young woman you are today, and the woman you will become. Now spread your wings and soar.

Pictures are worth a thousand words – but only if you know the words.
(Don’t forget to journal)

Remember your history. To forget is to not belong. (Charlotte A. Black Elk)

Sooner or later a person learns to write thing down.
It’s the best way to capture things we are apt to forget.
The strongest memory is weaker than the palest ink.

What is not written and recorded is soon forgotten. Just as our photographs need an acid-free environment to protect them, our words need a place to be stored. Our stories need a place to rest, to be treasured and safely contained. Our albums become our treasure chests that keep our pictures and words from the ravages of time, dust and decay. Words allow us to gather the pictures and meanings together and give them as gifts to those we love. (UM Jenifer P.)

Family Heirloom

(Jeannine Richardson)

For every picture you take a moment in time is remembered
A family’s heritage is its personal journey through history
Memories will fade making the written word priceless
In every family someone must take time to preserve its past
Looking at the past can strengthen who you are today
Yesterday is gone, but the memories are cherished through photos and journals.

Hours of enjoyment are held within the pages of the family scrapbook,
Everyone has pictures…everyone has a story to tell…
It’s not the jewels or china we would risk our lives for in a fire
Rich is the family who knows who they are…and where they came from
Learning to properly preserve photographs is not difficult
Old photographs lack the joy they could have when not preserved and labeled
Ordinary moments become special when captured on film
May we not put off any longer the task of preserving our heritage.

Music Soothes The Savage Beast

Now playing: Depeche Mode – Pleasure, Little Treasure (Join Mix)
via FoxyTunes I found an interesting quote today, and it made me think.

It’s no good pretending that any relationship has a future if your record collections

—————-
Now playing: Depeche Mode – Pleasure, Little Treasure (Join Mix)
via FoxyTunes disagree violently or if your favorite films wouldn’t even speak to each other if they met at a party.
Nick Hornby

If you have been to my blog before, you know that much of my interest in journaling is related to genealogy and family history. Leaving behind something of myself in a tangible written or printed form.

I don’t necessarily agree with this quote. I did not listen to Country music before I started dating my husband. I listened to it in order to better appreciate his interest in it. I did however, like the old classic stuff like Johnny Cash and George Jones, which my parents listened to. I learned to like some of the newer country, by listening to it.

My husband likes some of the Rock I am into, but not all of it. I don’t believe he likes the Alternative stuff I’m into, but he likes some AC/DC and some Kid Rock and some GNR, but he’ll never be a head banger. Me, I used to religiously stay up for MTVs HeadBangers Ball. I won’t ever outgrow it. I do expand my areas of interest though. I like groups like The White Stripes and Greenday(before they got so anti war and anti American). I prefer harder stuff like GodSmack. There’s nothing that makes you feel less like screaming than listening to someone else do it.

My daughter likes mostly what’s on the pop charts, which my son disdains. He tends to like my old 80’s stuff and harder rock too.

The point is, we have all influenced each others tastes, by being open minded to a certain degree. That is what makes any relationship between 2 people work, not agreeing on everything. Agreeing to disagree is more important, if you can’t come to a compromise.

In reference to family history. I come from a long line of music loving people. My paternal Grandpa was a very good musician. He played on the radio, back when they still had live shows in the 40’s. He may have been able to make a living at it, but my Grandma didn’t believe in him being in the bars and places you have to go in order to do that, since he had a wife and 2 kids. So, he chose his family.

All of his brothers and sisters had beautiful singing voices, and I have some recordings of them together. My Grandpa could play several instruments and his siblings could too. I sang with them when I was a small girl. Thad made me be the 3rd generation. I have a great love for music, but not the work that goes with it.

My maternal grandparents could both sing very well too. My grandmother used to be invited to churches to sing.

I was in my junior high band, but did not stick with it and when I was in high school, I taught myself to play a little guitar. I didn’t stick with that either. I love to sing though.

My kids inherited music from me. Before they were born, they would both respond very actively to music in utero. My daughter used to play piano and my son saxaphone, but like me they didn’t stick with it.

My grandson loves music and has a natural sense of rhythm. When he was little, I would play Depeche Mode for him, and he would tap his foot to it in perfect rhythm. He was only 3-4 months old and you wouldn’t think he would be able to tap his foot, but he did. He has a keyboard and seems to be able to make actual music on it, as opposed to just banging the keys. His father plays guitar and given my daughters musical inclinations and his father’s, it would be amazing if he didn’t have some talent.

For those interested in scrapbooking/digitial scrapbooking here is a layout of my grandson enjoying music with my DH.

Heredity is an amazing thing.

WISDOM LEARNED

Did you learn some wisdom from your grandparents by example, like patience, strength, unselfishness, value of knowledge, love, action over words?

Journal how they taught you this. While I am typing this, one thing comes to mind for me. My grandpa told me that the most valuable thing he had to leave me was his good name, and my Father has told me the same thing many times. It is one thing that is hard for someone else to take from you. You can destroy it yourself.

FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS

Do you have your mother’s eyes or your father’s nose? Where did your curly hair come from?

People in my family tend to be double jointed.

When I started looking at old heritage photos, I discovered that I have characteristics that I got from Great Grandparents which appear to have skipped a generation or two.

What about going beyong the physical? Musical or artistic talent? Did you inherit someone’s personality traits? Shyness, sense of Humor, love of animals, or nature or appreciation of music?

Do you have some stories about this?

HISTORICAL EVENTS OF YOUR LIFE

There are places on the net where you can look up what happened on certain days or in certain years of your life. Try to remember where you were when they happened and how you felt and who you talked to about them. Do you think the event had an effect on your life? Did you learn something from it or change your way of thinking? Is there a reason you think it is an event that should be remembered?

I remember when Elvis Presley died. I was visiting my grandparents in Chesapeake, Ohio. It is across from Huntington, WV. Elvis was supposed to appear there at the newly built Civic Center. There wasn’t much to do at their house, so I was on the front porch listening to the radio. The radio reports were how I learned he had died. I remember feeling that my parents would understand the importance of the event more than my grandparents did if only they had been there. I felt like I was the only person on earth who knew the aliens had landed.