What Makes You Feel Powerful

I recently read a journaling prompt which asked, “What makes you feel Powerful.”  I know that for some people having children makes them feel powerful because their children are completely under their control. Some people feel powerful in jobs positions which give them subordinate employees. I know for a fact that many school teachers and principals get a charge from their authority.

The thing that first made me feel powerful and in awe simultaneously was realizing that just by being in the same room with my husband could have an effect on him. I am not necessarily referring to sexual chemistry.  After we met we have never wanted to be apart.  We immediatly became halves of a whole and each other. I know that he feels the same way, because he has said so without my prompting.  It may be true that absense makes the heart grow stronger. We used to live 3 hours from each other.

I also remember that when I was in junior high school I realized that my words or my level of vocaublary gave me an edge over kids who had teased me mercilessly since kindergarden.  Suddenly I realized that with a well worded sentence that I could turn their insults back on them. I took particular satisfaction from insulting them in a way that they didn’t understand and it was even greater when they had to ask someone what I had just said and make fools of themselves. Truly the pen/word is mightiers than the sword. I also had to learn not to abuse the power.

What makes you feel powerful

Being Preoccupied

I haven’t made any posts for a while. My Dad was diagnosed with terminal stomach/esophaghus cancer in November and he passed away on April 12th.  I have been searching for devotionals and quotes to help me through the grieving process.

I have also decided that I am going to scrap all of my photos of Dad.  I kept thinking about where to start. Then it came to me. Someone once said begin at the beginning.  So, tonight I did a layout of Dad as a baby.  It is a regular scrap page, not digital.  I wanted to use the photos as they were.  It helped me some to imagine my Dad as a child and not remember him the way he was at the end.

To that end, here are a few of the quotes I found for the grieving process and about fathers.

My Father When I Was…

4 years old: My daddy can do anything.
5 years old: My daddy knows a whole lot.
6 years old: My dad is smarter than your dad.
8 years old: My dad doesn’t know exactly everything.
10 years old: In the olden days when my dad grew up, things were different.
12 years old: Oh, well, naturally, Father doesn’t know anything about that. He is too old to remember his childhood.
14 years old: Don’t pay attention to my Father. He is so old-fashioned!
21 years old: Him? My Lord, he’s hopelessly out-of- date.
25 years old: Dad knows a little bit about it, but then he should because he has been around so long.
30 years old: Maybe we should ask Dad what he thinks. After all, he’s had a lot of experience.
35 years old: I’m not doing a single thing until I talk to Dad.
40 years old: I wonder how Dad would have handled it. He was so wise and had a world of experience.
50 years old: I’d give anything if Dad were here now so I could talk this over with him. Too bad I didn’t appreciate how smart he was. I could have learned a lot from him.

A Dad is someone you never outgrow your need for

Fathers are men who give daughters away to other men who aren’t nearly good enough…
so they can have grandchildren who are smarter than anybody’s.

My father taught me to be independent and cocky and free thinking, but he could not stand if it I disagreed with him. (Sara Maitland)

It’s only when we truly know and understand that we have a limited time on earth — and that we have no way of knowing when our time is up, we will then begin to live each day to the fullest, as if it was the only one we had.- Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

God’s finger touched him, and he slept. – Alfred, Lord Tennyson

I can see your falling tears, I can hear your cries and prayers, Yet I smile and whisper this : — “I am not that thing you kiss; Cease your tears and let it lie: It was mine, it is not I.”
– from After Death, by Sir Edwin Arnold.

If you would like to see what I made with baby photos, here is the link. Daddy

Music Soothes The Savage Beast

Now playing: Depeche Mode – Pleasure, Little Treasure (Join Mix)
via FoxyTunes I found an interesting quote today, and it made me think.

It’s no good pretending that any relationship has a future if your record collections

—————-
Now playing: Depeche Mode – Pleasure, Little Treasure (Join Mix)
via FoxyTunes disagree violently or if your favorite films wouldn’t even speak to each other if they met at a party.
Nick Hornby

If you have been to my blog before, you know that much of my interest in journaling is related to genealogy and family history. Leaving behind something of myself in a tangible written or printed form.

I don’t necessarily agree with this quote. I did not listen to Country music before I started dating my husband. I listened to it in order to better appreciate his interest in it. I did however, like the old classic stuff like Johnny Cash and George Jones, which my parents listened to. I learned to like some of the newer country, by listening to it.

My husband likes some of the Rock I am into, but not all of it. I don’t believe he likes the Alternative stuff I’m into, but he likes some AC/DC and some Kid Rock and some GNR, but he’ll never be a head banger. Me, I used to religiously stay up for MTVs HeadBangers Ball. I won’t ever outgrow it. I do expand my areas of interest though. I like groups like The White Stripes and Greenday(before they got so anti war and anti American). I prefer harder stuff like GodSmack. There’s nothing that makes you feel less like screaming than listening to someone else do it.

My daughter likes mostly what’s on the pop charts, which my son disdains. He tends to like my old 80’s stuff and harder rock too.

The point is, we have all influenced each others tastes, by being open minded to a certain degree. That is what makes any relationship between 2 people work, not agreeing on everything. Agreeing to disagree is more important, if you can’t come to a compromise.

In reference to family history. I come from a long line of music loving people. My paternal Grandpa was a very good musician. He played on the radio, back when they still had live shows in the 40’s. He may have been able to make a living at it, but my Grandma didn’t believe in him being in the bars and places you have to go in order to do that, since he had a wife and 2 kids. So, he chose his family.

All of his brothers and sisters had beautiful singing voices, and I have some recordings of them together. My Grandpa could play several instruments and his siblings could too. I sang with them when I was a small girl. Thad made me be the 3rd generation. I have a great love for music, but not the work that goes with it.

My maternal grandparents could both sing very well too. My grandmother used to be invited to churches to sing.

I was in my junior high band, but did not stick with it and when I was in high school, I taught myself to play a little guitar. I didn’t stick with that either. I love to sing though.

My kids inherited music from me. Before they were born, they would both respond very actively to music in utero. My daughter used to play piano and my son saxaphone, but like me they didn’t stick with it.

My grandson loves music and has a natural sense of rhythm. When he was little, I would play Depeche Mode for him, and he would tap his foot to it in perfect rhythm. He was only 3-4 months old and you wouldn’t think he would be able to tap his foot, but he did. He has a keyboard and seems to be able to make actual music on it, as opposed to just banging the keys. His father plays guitar and given my daughters musical inclinations and his father’s, it would be amazing if he didn’t have some talent.

For those interested in scrapbooking/digitial scrapbooking here is a layout of my grandson enjoying music with my DH.

Heredity is an amazing thing.

WISDOM LEARNED

Did you learn some wisdom from your grandparents by example, like patience, strength, unselfishness, value of knowledge, love, action over words?

Journal how they taught you this. While I am typing this, one thing comes to mind for me. My grandpa told me that the most valuable thing he had to leave me was his good name, and my Father has told me the same thing many times. It is one thing that is hard for someone else to take from you. You can destroy it yourself.

WHAT GENEALOGY MEANS TO ME

I thought would put up another one of my recent LO I did for my heritage scrapbook.

Here is the journaling that went on it:

have been thinking about what genealogy means to me this evening. I suppose it is a little like being a tree. I know that I have roots just below the surface of the ground. I just had to bend over and start digging to discover what anchored me to the earth, where I came from and how deep those roots ran.

There are mixed opinions in the scientific vommunity as to whether nature or nurture dictates what we become. But when you study genealogy, you begin to see both influences. You know these people passed on their genetics to you, but they also pass their life experiences on to you. Events that occured hundreds of years before you were conceived helped to shape who you are. It reaffirms my faith that God was considering my small life long ago, too.

If I were a gambler, I would say that the odds of my maternal family line and my paternal family line coming together from the same part of Virginia over 250 years ago and then reconnecting again in my parents, being a coincidence are 1 in a million.

After we were married for 18 years, I discovered that my husband and I were 5th cousins. Despite being raised 300 miles apart, somehow our family lines had managed to reconnect yet again.

Maybe some people wouldn’t find that profound, but to feel like I am part of a greater plan both humbles and comforts me.

what-genealogy-means1.jpg

PROCRASTINATION

PROCRASTINATION IS THE FINE ART OF AVOIDING THE INEVITABLE.THERE USED TO BE A JOKE GOING AROUND WHERE YOU GAVE A PERSON WHO FREQUENTLY SAID “I WILL DO IT WHEN I GET AROUND TO IT”A ROUND CARDBOARD CIRCLE WITH THE WORDS “ROUND TO IT”, PRINTED ON IT.

ANOTHER PHRASE FREQUENTLY USED BY THE PROCRASTINATOR IS, ” I WILL CROSS THAT BRIDGE WHEN I GET TO IT”. I READ SOMEWHERE THATTHE COVERED BRIDGE IS ALMOST EXTINCT. THIS BRIDGE IS IN THE PART OF VIRGINIA THAT MY ANCESTORS SETTLED IN DURING THE LATE 1700’S.I WONDER IF MY FOREBEARS WERE PRONE TO AVOID THINGS TOO.WAS THEIR TENDENCY TO PICK UP AND MOVE ON EVIDENCE THAT THEY WOULD LEAVE RATHER THAN DEAL WITH THE UNNECESSARY?ALL PROCRASTINATION IS NOT BAD. IT CAN BE A FORM OF PRIORITIZATION.;A SORT OF ITEMIZATION, WITH MORE IMPORTANT THINGS HIGHER UP ON THE LIST.

THE PERPETUAL QUESTION THE PROCRASTINATOR ALWAYS HAS TO WEIGH IS THIS:AS THE WORLD MODERNIZES, AND COVERED BRIDGES GO THE WAY OF THE HORSE AND BUGGY, WILL WE PROCRASTINATORS STILL BE ABLE TO CROSS THE BRIDGE OR WILL WE BE STRANDED ON THE WRONG SIDE?

HERE IS MY SCRAPBOOK LAYOUT I MADE TO GO WITH THIS JOURNALING.

PROCRASTINATION

procrastination-26.jpg