St. Patrick’s Day

Don’t forget to look over on the left in the category cloud for Irish Blessings. There is sure to be some inspiration there for your holiday journaling.

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Journaling Inspiration?

I sometimes have so much bottled up inside of me and so many simultaneous trains of thoughts that I have no idea where to begin when I want to journal.

I recently found a good website for inspiration. There are good suggestions here whether you journal in the traditional manner, or you journal for scrapbooking.  http://debbiehodge.com/2012/03/keep-a-5-year-journal-progress-to-date-and-prompts-for-april/

There are suggestions here for 365 days of the year.

Being Preoccupied

I haven’t made any posts for a while. My Dad was diagnosed with terminal stomach/esophaghus cancer in November and he passed away on April 12th.  I have been searching for devotionals and quotes to help me through the grieving process.

I have also decided that I am going to scrap all of my photos of Dad.  I kept thinking about where to start. Then it came to me. Someone once said begin at the beginning.  So, tonight I did a layout of Dad as a baby.  It is a regular scrap page, not digital.  I wanted to use the photos as they were.  It helped me some to imagine my Dad as a child and not remember him the way he was at the end.

To that end, here are a few of the quotes I found for the grieving process and about fathers.

My Father When I Was…

4 years old: My daddy can do anything.
5 years old: My daddy knows a whole lot.
6 years old: My dad is smarter than your dad.
8 years old: My dad doesn’t know exactly everything.
10 years old: In the olden days when my dad grew up, things were different.
12 years old: Oh, well, naturally, Father doesn’t know anything about that. He is too old to remember his childhood.
14 years old: Don’t pay attention to my Father. He is so old-fashioned!
21 years old: Him? My Lord, he’s hopelessly out-of- date.
25 years old: Dad knows a little bit about it, but then he should because he has been around so long.
30 years old: Maybe we should ask Dad what he thinks. After all, he’s had a lot of experience.
35 years old: I’m not doing a single thing until I talk to Dad.
40 years old: I wonder how Dad would have handled it. He was so wise and had a world of experience.
50 years old: I’d give anything if Dad were here now so I could talk this over with him. Too bad I didn’t appreciate how smart he was. I could have learned a lot from him.

A Dad is someone you never outgrow your need for

Fathers are men who give daughters away to other men who aren’t nearly good enough…
so they can have grandchildren who are smarter than anybody’s.

My father taught me to be independent and cocky and free thinking, but he could not stand if it I disagreed with him. (Sara Maitland)

It’s only when we truly know and understand that we have a limited time on earth — and that we have no way of knowing when our time is up, we will then begin to live each day to the fullest, as if it was the only one we had.- Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

God’s finger touched him, and he slept. – Alfred, Lord Tennyson

I can see your falling tears, I can hear your cries and prayers, Yet I smile and whisper this : — “I am not that thing you kiss; Cease your tears and let it lie: It was mine, it is not I.”
– from After Death, by Sir Edwin Arnold.

If you would like to see what I made with baby photos, here is the link. Daddy

What’s Up With Me

I’m sitting here feeling emotions so strong that I might be overwhelmed by them. I know that I am nowhere near the worst part yet. I can’t face my fears head on and I can’t run fast enough to escape them. I am just going parallel to them for now. I know there is going to be a place down the road where my path and these fears are going to converge.

I am so tired of running this race with death. For the past 6 years, I have had the constant fear of my husband dying, because of his neurological condition. I have been slapped in the face by my own mortality the past few years after my diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythmatosis. I think my case is going to be the long drawn out chronic condition, but I know a bad case of some infection could wipe me out. Just when I seemed able to travel along with death for a piece, companionably, my Daddy has been diagnosed with cancer.

He has always been the one who would make things right in my world. When I have run out of options, I can go to him for advice and help. My Dad and Grandpa are/were ministers, so I have relied on them for spiritual guidance as well as the practical kind. I’m gonna be on my own now and I don’t know who I am going to rely on.

I do not know if I am strong enough for a world where my husband or my Dad no longer reside.

I found an old photo of my parents, when they were young and full of promise and did a scrapbook page. You can see it here.

The Meaning Of Life

I have plenty of things to stress over, but sometimes something happens to put things into better, if not perfect perspective. I just found out my Dad has cancer. Scrapbooking is being my therapy for the moment. I did a layout of my parents in 1961. Something about the picture made me think of the beginning of life, rather than the end. If you are interested, here’s a link to it.

Stress Quotes

I found a few quotes on my Get rid of stress quest.

I have tried yoga, but stress is less boring.

Stress is nothing more than a socially acceptable form of mental illness. ~Richard Carlson

Pooh is my favorite so this one is great.

Don’t underestimate the value of Doing Nothing, of just going along, listening to all the things you can’t hear, and not bothering. ~Pooh’s Little Instruction Book, inspired by A.A. Milne

This one seems to be my life.

I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once. ~Jennifer Yane

Now I know this one suits my life. I cannot bear to be around a very loud, overly boisterous person for long. I am a quiet person. My husband is too. Whether by nurture or nature, our children are sensitive to noise as well. I am talking about people who can be at a party down the street from you and you can hear them at your house. They seem to believe that noise will force people to notice them. But if they were quiet for a few moments wonders might happen.

When Mozart was composing at the end of the eighteenth century, the city of Vienna was so quiet that fire alarms could be given verbally, by a shouting watchman mounted on top of St. Stefan’s Cathedral. In twentieth-century society, the noise level is such that it keeps knocking our bodies out of tune and out of their natural rhythms. This ever-increasing assault of sound upon our ears, minds, and bodies adds to the stress load of civilized beings trying to live in a highly complex environment. ~Steven Halpern

My daughter spent the afternoon with her grandmother one afternoon when she was little. She was very pensive when she came home. When she finally got up the nerve to talk to me, she asked me if her hands were the devils work shop. I was speechless for a few seconds. I told her of course not. My mother-in-law had told her that, because she was reading. I have always believed that if you are comfortable being with yourself, in a quiet environment, you can have all sorts of profound thoughts and it is a good way to commune with your maker. I don’t think he likes it if you don’t give him your undivided attention. I told my daughter that you did not have to be working all the time in order to be a good person. But, in addition to that there are people who work really hard all of the time and are the meanest, low down excuses for human beings as you would ever meet. Work neither makes you good or bad.


A life spent in constant labor is a life wasted, save a man be such a fool as to regard a fulsome obituary notice as ample reward. ~George Jean Nathan